Ultimate Recipe Guide For RVing Holiday Dinners

Some holiday traditions should be abandoned, like slaving away in the kitchen. What fun is it if everyone else is having a good time but you’re stuck with the cooking? If you don’t enjoy the hassle of making a big holiday dinner in your sticks and bricks home, it’s time to start the holiday season on the road with RVing holiday dinners.

RVing holiday dinners
It`s easy to cook old favorites such as green beans, brussels sprouts or even asparagus – seen here – over an open grill at a campsite for a side of any holiday dinner. Photo courtesy of Bruce B www.airforums.com member.

RVing Holiday Dinners are Easy

Do you live in an area with mild weather this time of year? Then pack up the RV and move your holiday season celebrations to a great RV campground. When you move the party to your favorite state or national park it`s like gaining an extra summer weekend at year’s end. As a result, the best part is that RVing holiday dinners are less labor intensive than a traditional sticks-and-bricks feast, but they are just as much fun to enjoy. Here’s how to prepare for your all new custom:

Meal Prep Tips for RVing Holidays

Many traditional holiday meal components like dips, salads and pies can be prepped and even made ahead of your departure. What`s more, once you arrive, a barbecue grill, pressure cooker and cast iron skillet can replicate your favorite holiday meals at the campsite, without any fuss. Use them in the following ways:

  • Toss the turkey and try Cornish game hens or turkey sausages. Most RV ovens are too small to cook turkeys, so consider grilling your main meat dish instead.
  • Pre-cook time intensive side dishes like squash and potatoes in the pressure cooker. Make them in shifts then pop them in the oven together.
  • Cast iron skillets for sides can be placed on a stovetop or campfire. Cook old favorites like green beans or seared Brussels sprouts with garlic in this multipurpose pan that’s a must-have for RVers.

Great Recipes for RVing Holiday Meals

RVing holiday dinners
Fruit compotes are easy to make in RV kitchens.

Keep your favorite holiday meal recipes and retire the rest. For some added excitement turn to these innovative RVing holiday dinner recipes spotlighted by RVlife.com food writer and culinary maven, Marian Platt.

Celebrating Diversity on Thanksgiving” shares an entire RVing holiday meal menu including:

  • Clam Dip
  • Apple, Pecan and Dried Cherry Salad
  • Chilled Cranberry Maple Sauce
  • Corn Pudding
  • Grilled Cornish Game Hens
  • Italian Turkey Sausages

Stuffing or Dressing?” starts your holiday meal right with four stuffing recipes:

  • Cranberry Stuffing Balls
  • Southern Cornbread and Sausage Stuffing
  • Traditional Bread Stuffing with Herbs
  • Fruit and Vegetable Dressing with Nuts

Holiday Sweet Potatoes” mixes up this old favorite. From candied and mashed to baked, here’s a collection of several ways to enjoy this must-have side dish, including:

  • Baked Sweet Potato Sticks for Two
  • Mashed Honey Roasted Sweet Potatoes
  • Sweet Potatoes with Apples
  • Sweet Potato Pie

Give Thanks for Succotash” pays tribute to the corn and lima bean classic, with variations such as:

  • Traditional Succotash
  • Down Home Succotash with Bacon
  • Succotash with Zucchini and Peppers
RVing holiday dinners
Make old favorites ahead of time.

Tis the Season for Pie” gives suggestions for pie fillings you can easily make in the RV. Just pour into a pre-made pie crust and enjoy any of these:

  • Pear Cranberry Lattice Pie
  • Pecan Pie
  • Pumpkin Pie
  • Sour Cream Raisin Pie
  • Mince Pie
  • Apple Pie

Eggnog, a Holiday Tradition” puts everyone in the festive spirit with creatively cooked ways to enjoy this popular favorite, including:

  • Bread Pudding
  • Fruit Topping
  • Eggnog Cake

Great RVing holiday meals don’t have to be restricted to the Fourth of July and Labor Day. Make the most of your year-round camping climate by adding Thanksgiving and the winter holidays to your annual RV celebrations.

Images: Pixabay.com



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Financing Options by Towable or Motorized

In the financing options (Websites > Content > Your Site > Pricing > Finance Options) there is now a choice to relate a product group with your financing option. Now you are able to have different financing options per product group. ie: Towables may have a 6.99% interest rate where Motorized could have 4.99% interest rate.

 

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Remove Tag From All Units

We have added the ability to remove units a tag from all units at once while still keeping the tag.

 

If you go to CP > Settings > Unit Tags you’ll see a new minus icon to far right of tag name in last column. If you click this it will remove that tag from any/all associated units.  It will NOT delete the tag physically.

 

If you wanted to remove a tag physically, just remove all units, then click the trash can to completely remove the tag.

 

So, next time you add a ‘show tag’ to 30 units and the show is over, you can locate the tag and easily remove all units from it in one shot.

 

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Easier Permits for Arizona’s BLM Boondocking RVers and Campers

Are you one of the thousands of BLM boondocking RVers flying south to Arizona this winter? If so you’ll love having one less thing to do before setting up camp in Yuma or Quartzsite.  The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) short and long term visitation area (LTVA) permit system is now digital at YourPassNow.com.

BLM Boondocking Permit Changes in Arizona, Other Destinations

Quartzsite LTVA
Arizona BLM boondocking just got easier.

Whether you’re joining snowbird crowds and headed to a Quartzsite RV rally, boating on the Colorado River or making family road trip plans to the Grand Canyon, now you can buy your recreation permit before ever leaving home.

“Purchasing a permit through YourPassNow offers our visitors improved access to recreational opportunities on public lands,” said William Mack, Jr., BLM’s Colorado River District manager. In a recent press release outlining the service,Mack reported that “This digital service will greatly improve the convenience of visiting LTVA sites for our visitors and streamline our internal BLM fee collection process.”

Between September 15 and April 15, BLM permits are required in many camping areas. For example, any camper who enjoys cheap or free BLM boondocking in popular BLM Long Term Visitor Area dispersed camping destinations like Quartzsite, Lake Havasu and Yuma must have visible BLM parking decals on their rig. Boaters cruising along the 155 miles of lower Colorado River managed by the agency must also have permits.

How the New BLM Permit System Works

Remember when you had to arrive at a BLM LTVA during business hours to get a permit before setting up camp? The new YourPassNow.com website gives you the ability to secure a permit online before ever leaving home.

After completing the online purchase process, you must print the receipt as proof of your purchase. Upon arrival in LTVA areas, you then trade it for visible BLM parking stickers. Buyers can obtain the decals during normal business hours at three LTVA stations:

  • La Posa LTVA – Tyson Wash Contact Station
  • Imperial LTVA Contact Station
  • Yuma Field Office

Once exchanged for the official permit and decal, the LTVA permit is valid for BLM boondocking at all of the Bureau of Land Management LTVAs:

  • Hot Spring
  • Imperial
  • La Posa
  • Midland
  • Mule Mountain
  • Pilot Knob
  • Tamarisk

The LTVA permits are special recreation area permits authorizing permit holders to use the LTVAs. These areas that designated as highly impacted “special areas” by the BLM. The new permit system website makes life easier for the tens of thousands of BLM boondocking enthusiasts who enjoy low cost winter camping in Arizona. Buyers must keep in mind that no discounts apply to the LTVA long term or short-visit permit fee. Unused or unwanted permits are non-refundable.

Get Permits for Many Other Destinations

BLM boondocking permits

The system is the result of a partnership between the BLM Yuma Field Office and NIC Inc., a digital government services provider. YourPassNow is the latest big news from the BLM. It’s the easiest and fastest way for road trippers to purchase advance permits. The service is good for many other popular camping destinations like Sequoia and King’s Canyon National Park, Everglades National Park and Colorado National Monument.



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Data Mappings are simple! – Interact Support Blog

We have now improved on the layout of the Control Panel, and now, you can find all of the data mappings bundled in one place in the Control Panel. This makes it easier than ever to manage your manufacturer, make, product and unit tags data maps!

You will find the new page located under Settings Tab in the control panel, or you can just click here to get there. Enjoy!

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Head-Smashed-In Buffalo Jump In Alberta, Canada

If you have driven through Fort Macleod in southwestern Alberta, Canada, you may have noticed a blue highway sign proclaiming “Head-Smashed-In Buffalo Jump Next Exit.”  It is a location name that sort of sticks with you and makes you want to go find out more.  And you SHOULD!

Head-Smashed-In Buffalo Jump
The northern cliff face of the Head-Smashed-In Buffalo Jump, used by ancient people to hunt buffalo for over 6,000 years. (Photo by Ken Thomas/Wikipedia)

The Head-Smashed-In Buffalo Jump is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and hosts a fantastic cultural experience of the lives of ancient Plains people.  The location is significant for its cultural, archaeological, and scientific interest.

It is one of the oldest and most well-preserved sites known that gives an archaeological insight into communal hunting and living by people over 6,000 years ago.

The buffalo jump was used by indigenous people of the plains, including the Blackfoot, to kill buffalo by driving them off the 1,000-foot long, 36-foot high sandstone cliff.  A known buffalo grazing area was located west of the site.

Specialized young hunters, called Buffalo Runners, would dress as coyotes or wolves and use their knowledge of animal behavior to drive the herd into drive lanes and then over the edge of the cliff.

After falling, injured buffalo were killed by waiting hunters.  The community camped below the cliffs would then work together to process the carcasses and use them for food, tools, hide, and to appease the spirits.  This technique was used throughout many plains areas in North America.

Head-Smashed-In Buffalo Jump
Don’t miss this World Heritage Site. (Photo by Lazarus000/Wikipedia)

Visiting Head-Smashed-In Buffalo Jump

The interpretive center at the Head-Smashed-In Buffalo Jump includes indoor and outdoor exhibits and experiences.  The site is open year-round with various events showcasing the complex prehistoric cultural aspects.

Storytellers and artists are often available, as well as a permanent exhibition of photography called “Lost Identities: A Journey of Rediscovery” that began in 1999.

You can take an interpretive hike with a knowledgeable Blackfoot guide to visit the drive trails where ancient Plains people would drive buffalo to the cliff face. In addition, you can see the work of archaeologists who are learning about the ancient cultures from the artifacts in the area, and you can learn about the importance of buffalo to the Plains people, and their eventual demise.

There is also a re-enactment of the hunt to give visitors a better insight into the life and customs of the ancient Plains people.

Check RV Park Reviews for campgrounds near Fort Macleod for a place to stay!

You may also like: Don’t Miss This Historic Site In The Bighorn Mountains



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New: Sort By Location is Now Available

For the dealers with multiple lots, we have now added the ability for users to sort by distance! This is now bundled with every dealer’s site that has multiple lots. When a user is on a listing page, they are offered the option to sort by distance, when selected, the user will see a pop-up where they are prompted to add their zip code. Once the user adds their zip code, the units are sorted by lots with the closest lot showing first.

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Places To Visit, Campgrounds And Boondocking In Bighorn National Forest

A couple of entries ago we visited Medicine Wheel National Historic Landmark in Wyoming’s Bighorn Mountains. In this installment, we will look at many more points of interest an adventurous RVer will want to visit while in the vicinity of the Medicine Wheel.

First off are two nearby waterfalls of considerable size. The first you will encounter is Porcupine Falls. The falls features a 200-foot thundering vertical drop into a pool at the base. The falls can only be viewed from the base requiring a short but relatively steep hike.

Bighorn National Forest
Porcupine Falls. All photos by author (Dave Helgeson)

The small opening in the cliff-face, about a third of the way up to the right of the falls, is the remnant of a tunnel that used to power a mining operation.

Once you have explored Porcupine Falls, continue north down the road to Bucking Mule Falls.

Many consider Bucking Mule Falls the most impressive waterfall in Wyoming’s Bighorn Mountains. The listed height of the falls varies depending on the source—some claim 300 feet, others say it’s up to a 600-foot drop.

Realistically, the falls are comparable in height to Porcupine Falls. The hike to the falls viewpoint is considerably longer than Porcupine Falls, but not as steep as the falls can be viewed from the top rather than the base.

Bighorn National Forest
The author at Bald Mountain City Site

While the Bighorn Mountains were never a major source of precious metals, some mining did take place in the Bighorns providing some historic places to explore.

Mixed among the beautiful places to boondock in the mountains you will find the remains of Bald Mountain City, the Fortunatus Mill, and a gold sluicing operation.

Bighorn National Forest
The site of the old Fortunatus Mill

Here is a short description of the mining activity that occurred:

“Discoveries of fine-grained gold north of Bald Mountain were made in 1890. ‘Gold Fever’ brought many prospectors to the area over the next 10 years. In 1892, the Fortunatus Mining and Milling Company purchased a group of claims on the head of the Little Big Horn River and Porcupine Creek.

The excitement led to the establishment of Bald Mountain City, the most extensive attempt at a settlement in the Big Horn Mountains. Near Bald Mountain City are the remains of the old Fortunatus Mill. The gold rush ended by 1900 because yields were not enough to pay for the effort of panning.”

In addition to the waterfall and historical stops, be sure to keep a lookout for wildlife as you explore, as the area is a mecca for moose, deer, and other animals.

Bighorn National Forest
A moose we spotted
How to get there
  • The trailhead for Porcupine Falls is just off Forest Service Road 14 at N44° 51.465 W107° 54.770  — Click here for trail details.
  • The trailhead for Bucking Mule Falls is just off Forest Service Road 14 at N44° 53.049 W107° 54.345 — Click here for trail details.
  • A sign marking the remains of the Fortunatus Mill can be found along Forest Service Road 13 at N44° 49.394 W107° 49.917
  • A sign marking the remains of Bald Mountain City can be found along Forest Service Road 123 at N44° 48.393 W107° 47.537

Those wishing to explore the remains of the sluicing operation will find them a short hike off of Forest Service Road 15 at N44° 49.811 W107°44.301

Bighorn National Forest
Boondocking in the area

Developed campgrounds in the area include Porcupine Campground and Bald Mountain Campground. You can also choose one of the many boondocking sites along the roads mentioned above.

Lots of exploring options from one camp, just another great adventure in RVing!

See also: Don’t Miss This Historic Site In The Bighorn Mountains



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