The Best Free Camping in Parker, Arizona

The week we scored an awesome site for free camping in Parker, Arizona! Free camping, also know as boondocking or dry camping, is a great way to economically explore the USA.

During the winter months Arizona is a hot spot for RVing. Parker (AZ) is located in between Quartzsite & Lake Havasu – making it an idea basecamp for your outdoor activities.

From our experience, it seems like Shea Road is a good choice for Class As, Bs, Cs, TTs & 5ers.

We found this free camping site in Parker, Arizona on Campendium (where it received 4 of 5 stars).

Location: Parker, Arizona

GPS: 34.1305, -114.1709

Date / Temp: We camped here for 4 nights in mid January. The weather was perfect. Daily highs were in the 70s and nights in the 40s. If you’re looking for great winter weather, Arizona is the place to be.

Amenities: This site offers no amenities and practices a “Pack In, Pack Out” policy.  We filled up with water in Quartzsite, Arizona. The town of Parker offers many options for buying filtered water, but it’s hard to find an RV water fill station.

There are easy dump options in Quartzsite as well.

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Free Camping in Parker, Arizona

Wifi / Cell: We received a 4G LTE signal with AT&T. The speeds allowed us to easily stream Netflix. We did use our WeBoost Cell Booster to increase upload speeds. Our T-Mobile Hot Spot received no connectivity.

Noise: The road is long and offers lots of space to spread out, or camp with a group. Noise was never an issue at our site. Even though we were close to the road, it was still quiet due to minimal auto traffic.

Grocery / Errands: Downtown Parker is 11 miles from our campsite, but only 1 mile from the entrance of Shea Road. The town offers a Walmart, Safeway and many dinning options.

Dog Friendly: This site is dog friendly. River had a lot of space to play and explore. 

Entertainment: Most of the entertainment is outdoor activities. Hiking & ATV enthusiasts will have plenty to explore. For a change of scenery,  take a day trip to Quartzsite or Lake Havasu.

Overall Experience of Free Camping in Parker, Arizona

We highly recommend this site if you’re in the area. For us, it is much more enjoyable than boondocking in Quartzsite.

If you’re interested in viewing all the free campsites we visit, click here!



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How to Get Free National and State Park Entry Passes

All parks budgets are squeezed to the max, but free national and state park entry passes are still a relatively easy thing to get. You’ll need to plan your RV trip carefully to do it, but the effort is worthwhile when you save the cash.

3 Tips for Free National And State Park Visits

free national and state park entry
Image: National Park Service.

Before getting started in your search for a free national and state park visit, remember a couple of things. First, you’ll save money with a free entrance pass, but in most cases the savings only apply to the actual park entry fee. Camping and other recreational fees like fishing usually apply once you’re inside the park. Second, those free park days tend to be quite busy, so don’t expect a ton of solitude once you arrive. Aside from those two limitations (and maybe others depending on the specific pass and location), scoring a free visit is pretty easy. Here’s how.

Go RVing on Free National Park Days

Unless you or a close family member qualifies for the free national parks pass for military members, or you have a child who qualifies for the free annual pass for fourth grade students, national park visits are more expensive all the time. The best way to get around the increases is by planning your adventure around any of the National Parks System’s free days that take place every year.

Drive into a national park on one of five annual free entry days and you’ll get a free ride for as long as the usual entry fee is good for (often up to seven days), as long as you never leave the gates. Keep these U.S. National Park Free Days in mind when planning your next adventure:

 January 21 – Martin Luther King, Jr. Day
April 20 – First Day of National Park Week/National Junior Ranger Day
August 25 – National Park Service Anniversary
September 28 – National Public Lands Day
November 11 – Veterans Day

Look for Free Days at Your Nearest State Park

Just do an internet search for “(your state) state park free days in (year)” and you might find a list of free park entrance days somewhere you want to camp.

For instance, the Washington State Parks and Recreation Commission is legally required to give residents 12 free Washington state park free entry days per year.

Oftentimes, free days coincide with some sort of state celebration. Places like Vermont and Colorado offer free admission on or around their statehood day celebrations. Other states like South Dakota have an Open House weekend with free admission to state parks. And Nevada offers free state park entry on Nevada Public Lands Days. Thankfully many of these celebrations are during the summer camping season!

Last but not least, most states offer free park entry all year round for military members.

Volunteer at National and State Parks

free national and state park entry
Image: NPS.gov

Perhaps the best way to get free national and state park entrance is to help the park systems with your time and labor. Many states like Georgia offer free days for volunteers on certain days of the year. And the National Park Service gives a free entry pass to volunteers who log 250 or more hours of work with the parks.

Most of us aren’t lucky enough to live in states like Connecticut and New Hampshire, which offer free state park entry to residents with valid car license plates. That’s when an internet search engine can be your best friend to help you find free park entry fees that work with your travel schedule. Good luck and happy camping!



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Free Hookup Sites For RVs

I have shared many times how I am compiling a national database on free places to camp or boondock in anticipation of that day when my wife and I have the opportunity to RV to the Midwest and East Coast. I have also shared how the farther east you travel, the more difficult it is to find areas to camp for free.

Imagine my surprise when I stumbled across this website that not only lists free places to camp across the country but that the sites listed include free utilities—many of them full hookups!

free hookup sites
See the full map on FreshTanks.net

Many of the places limit how long you can stay for free from one to several days, but free is free!!!

Most of the campgrounds are located in small cities in the Midwest and operated by the city in the hopes that you will stop and patronize their city, while others are operated by casinos with the hope you will stay and donate to their slot machines, but in either case they are a great option for an overnight stop along your route.

free hookup sites

With most of them providing free electrical hookups, these parks would be especially useful during hot weather when you need to operate your RV’s air conditioning.

While I haven’t had the opportunity to research all 78 listings on the website, the ones I did do a little research on confirmed that they are operating and offer free overnight stays with utilities!

free hookup sites

Click here to visit the website listing the free camping locations. Click here to watch a Youtube review of one of the parks by a fellow RVer.

When you visit one of these parks, be certain to thank those responsible, be a good camper during your stay and leave the campground better than you found it when you depart. Also be sure to research the RV parks and campgrounds on RV Park Reviews.

Camping for free with utilities, an adventure in RVing this thrifty ole Norwegian can get excited about! If you have experienced staying at any of the parks listed, please share.



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Free Dry Camping Near Big Timber, Montana At Otter Creek FAS

Needing a convenient and free spot to camp for the night while traveling through Montana via I-90, I looked over the list of Fishing Access Sites (FAS) and found Otter Creek FAS near Big Timber not too far off the freeway.

The site is along the banks of the Yellowstone River, just off a paved road, and best of all, overnight dry camping (there are no hookups available) is free!

Montana
Otter Creek. Photos by Dave Helgeson

As we approached on the road above the site, I saw a number of RVs already camped there and as it was close to dinner time, I hoped there was one more site available for us.

As we circled through the area passing by the already occupied sites while searching for open sites, I found it odd that there was a total absence of people in or around the RVs or anywhere for that matter. Despite the heat, there was nobody sitting outside in their lounge chairs under their awnings, in fact, their awnings weren’t even deployed.

Montana

Closer inspection revealed the RV windows were closed and the fact there were no generators humming to run the air conditioners, lead me to believe the RV owners weren’t in their RVs either.

Next, I noticed there were no tow vehicles parked in front of the travel trailers and fifth wheels. One RV had a couple of tents set up in front, of which one had been blown down by the wind. It began to feel like one of those sci-fi movies where the main characters drive into a town only to find the residents had mysteriously disappeared!

About that time, I spied an open level shady grassy space on the banks of the river, hunger and fatigue quickly overcame the fear of man-eating creatures lurking in the river, and I quickly pulled in.

camping

Since the site was level, we proceeded to cook dinner prior to unhitching the trailer and putting the jacks down. Just as we were finishing dinner, the next strange occurrence began to unfold when we spotted another RV coming down the hill into the fishing access site, slowly passing by our space either looking at our rig or seeing if they could squeeze into the remaining space in front of us, then proceeding to the other end of the access site where there were other areas to camp.

In short order, they were passing by our space again, this time stopping, at which time a lady got out of the vehicle and came towards our entry door (maybe she was checking to see if there were really people inside, unlike the other RVs). I stepped to the door to ask if I could help and she asked if we were staying. I let her know that we planned to stay the night and leave sometime the next day after visiting friends, that I just hadn’t had the chance to unhook and put the jacks down.

This is where it got real strange. She replied, “We are staying longer,” implying they were more entitled to the space than my wife and I staying only one night.

Now I could tell you how I responded, but I am more interested as to how the readers of this blog would have responded to this statement and its implications. Please share.

Also, to answer the question as to why there was nobody occupying the other RVs parked in the camping area? It wasn’t the plague, aliens or river creatures; it was the 50th Annual Montana Boat Float the coming weekend which brings hundreds of people, water craft and RVs riverside to participate.

Camping by yourself in a nearly “full” campground and then being asked to give up your space, just another strange adventure in RVing!



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Free Camping in Natchez, Mississippi // Review with Free Electricity

As we trek back to Alabama from the Texas panhandle, Natchez seemed like an easy overnight stop with great amenities. This visitor center overlooks the Mississippi River and is only a mile from the heart of downtown. BUT, best of all, this site offers free electricity!

The free campsite is listed on Campendium & FreeCampsites.

JOIN THE VIBE TRIBE

Location: Natchez, Mississippi

GPS31.5543, -91.4131

Date / Temp: We camped for just one night. It was overcast and 80 degrees. The clouds did clear for a beautiful sunset!

Amenities: This site offers tons of amenities. First, they have free 20 & 30 amp electric. There are only two 30A outlets, most are 20. They also offer water & dump. Inside the Visitor Center you can grab a free cup of coffee. Our favorite amenity (besides the electric) is its proximity to downtown.

Wifi / Cell: We received a 4G LTE signal with both AT&T and T-Mobile (using our WeBoost Cell Booster). The speeds were only ok. AT&T SPEEDS: 6.45Mbps down & 1.29Mbps up  T-MOBILE SPEEDS: 5.9Mbps down & 0.72Mbps up

Noise: This site had a few other rigs. The road noise was noticeable, but not as load as an interstate.

Dog Friendly: This site is dog friendly. River had a lot of space to play and explore. They also offer free doggy waste bags.

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Entertainment: We recommend walking downtown to explore the waterfront, dinning, shops and history. Take advantage of the two day stay limit here, and explore for two whole days!

If you’re interested in viewing all the free campsites we visit, click here!

Thanks for reading our blog! Our mission is to live minimally & deliberately as we explore the earth and it’s many communities. Help support our mission by shopping through our Amazon Link, or better still, listening to our new album!

Here are a few “Top Free Camping Lists” and boondocking resources if you’re interested in learning more!

Top 10 Free Campsites of 2017

Top 10 Free Campsites of 2016

Top 5 Waterfront Boondocking Sites

Top 5 Overnight Camping Spots

The Art of Free Camping



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Free Things To Do In Raleigh, North Carolina

North Carolina’s capital city of Raleigh is worth a visit any time of year. To explore the area, consider staying just west of town at North Carolina State Fairgrounds Campground, which has 350 sites.

The NC State Fairgrounds Campground offers full hookups including 30/50 amp electricity, sewer, water, and Wi-Fi. Reservations are not taken; it’s on a first come, first serve basis, unless it’s a large group. You can make advance group reservations by contacting the fairgrounds at (919) 839-4501 prior to arrival.

This large campground is open year-round, though the entire month of October is reserved for the annual state fair and no camping is allowed during that time.

Aerial view of Lonnie Poole Golf Course

With dozens of golf courses throughout the Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill-Research Triangle area, the opportunities for year-round golfing are endless.

One of the popular tracks is North Carolina State University’s Lonnie Poole Golf Course, which is the only collegiate course designed by golf legend Arnold Palmer. The par 72 stretches to 7,358 yards from the championship tees, a true test for the scratch golfer.

Raleigh
Image of Thomas Sayre’s “Gyre” (1999) in the NCMA Museum Park. Photo via Facebook

If you are looking for a few things to do in Raleigh, check out the Visit Raleigh website where they’ve compiled a list of 40 free things to do in the area. This impressive list will keep you busy for a week or so, and includes such things as parks, museums, historical places, markets, and gardens. A few examples include:

  • From dawn to dusk, you can visit the 164-acre Ann and Jim Goodnight Museum Park. Blended throughout its trail system, visitors can explore more than a dozen commissioned works of art. The trails are connected to the Capital Area Greenway System, and designed for walking, cycling, and jogging.
  • Adjacent to the park is the North Carolina Museum of Art that features more than a dozen galleries holding works from around the world and a variety of art types. Admission is free, but there are fees for specific programs, exhibitions, and large tours.
  • The JC Raulston Arboretum at North Carolina State University contains an incredible collection of more than 6,000 trees and shrubs from around the world. It includes numerous themed gardens, extensive plant collections, and more.

For more information on the Tar Heel State Capital, head to VisitRaleigh.com.  You can also see what RVers are saying about the North Carolina State Fairgrounds Campground on RV Park Reviews.

The post Free Things To Do In Raleigh, North Carolina appeared first on RV Life.


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Steam Boilers – Hassle Free Power Generation

A steam boiler is generally a machine to boil water, thereby to create steam which is then used for generating energy. A boiler is an air tight vessel in which a liquid is heated and the vapor exits at a high temperature and pressure. Normally used for heating and energy purposes. Apart from conventional energy sources, a modern steam boiler uses electricity instead of gasoline or coal. Here, there is an eco friendly aspect to using such a source for energy needs. These machines are available in many shapes and varieties like the electric boiler, hot water boiler and the vertical tubeless steam generators. Thermal energy is now being considered as an energy source of the future considering it's environmental impact is the least as compared to energy obtained from fossil fuels.

The pressure vessel contained in the boiler is made of steel nowdays although initially copper was used because of its high conductivity. Cast iron may also be used for the heating chamber but it would have been used for the purpose of hot water and not steam. The brittle and fragile nature of cast iron despite makes it unsafe to be used in a high pressure steam boiler.

In the growing industrialization phase and with the pressures of environmental pollution and potential degradation of the environment due to constant burning of fossil fuels, steam boilers may soon be the most widely used method of power and heat generation. Its key benefits are that it has a relatively low installation cost and essentially maintenance free. An added benefit is that it does not need a separate boiler room in which it should be installed. The installation can be done at any suitable place not too close to crowded areas. It works silently and emissions are totally not present. In a way, these boilers offer more safety and protection to the factory workers because there is no risk of a gas leakage or explosion because it runs on electricity and not fuel, and absolutely no risk of an explosion if the electric boilers are running with less than required amount of water.

Apart from this, routine check ups should have done to ensure that the boiler is working efficiently and has not developed any leaks or damages. Most boilers have a pre installed mechanism for detecting low water levels, but the older models need to be regularly monitored in order to prevent mishaps in the work place. Steam boilers have a long and promising way into the future and promise to reduce our dependence on fossil fuels.


Source by Jagger Parnel